Welcome To Para Cycling Federation of Singapore Website

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About Us

The Para cycling Federation of Singapore (PCFS), formerly known as the Handcycling Association of Singapore (HAS), is a non-profit national disability sports association. It is dedicated to the development of disabled athletes by promoting para cycling as a competitive sport, as a recreational activity and as a means of rehabilitation for persons with disabilities. Para cycling is a recognised sport and medal event at the Paralympics, and is also regarded as a form of alternative physiotherapy for those suffering from permanent or other disabilities such as cerebral palsy, stroke, etc. 

Our Aim

To create awareness of Para cycling as a sport that can enrich lives and help improve the overall physical and mental health of people with disabilities.
– To create an interactive and supportive environment for participants, with or without disabilities, to share their life experiences.
– To develop para cycling as a larger part of the local, regional, national and global cycling community.
– To eventually develop an elite para cycling team to compete amongst the best in the world and eventually to qualify for the Paralympics.
These aims will be achieved by actively promoting grassroots development and community outreach programs, to provide the disabled community with a platform for social interaction with peers through para cycling.

Our Story

PCFS started off as HAS, an informal group of members of the Spinal Cord Injury Support Group Singapore. They would meet on Saturday mornings to handcycle at Yio Chu Kang Stadium in early 2007. These support groups were started and owned by survivors of spinal cord injury and the rehab professionals at the Tan Tock Seng Hospital Rehabilitation Centre. Since then, this group of disabled sports enthusiasts have been meeting regularly to train and keep fit by hand cycling at their permanent home in ITE College East.

Today, the team has grown to include other para cyclists using normal and tandem bikes. There are two main teams based on seniority and experience. The competitive athletes train on Wednesday evenings, Saturday afternoons and Sunday mornings, while weekly Saturday afternoon training sessions are held for other para cyclists who have turned to the sport for both fitness and rehabilitative purposes, and competitive training. The Saturday sessions often include new participants to the sports as well.

The team has participated in various local and regional sporting events, competing against both other disabled, as well as able-bodied athletes. These include the Aviva 70.3 Ironman Triathlons, 2010 Guangzhou Asian Para Games, 2014 Incheon Asian Para Games and UCI Asian Para Cycling Championships.